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Copper Sulfate, Basic - Chemical Profile 1/85

                                Basic Copper Sulfate

      CHEMICAL NAME:      Copper sulfate

      TRADE NAME(S):      Tri-Basic (48)

      FORMULATION(S):     53% wettable powder (48)

      TYPE:               Inorganic copper fungicide

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  Cities Service Co.             CP Chemicals, Inc.
                          Industrial Chemicals Div.      Arbor St.
                          3445 Peachtree Rd., N.E.       P.O. Box 158
                          Atlanta, GA 30326              Sewaren, NJ 07077

      STATUS:             General use

      PRINCIPAL USES:     Foliar protectant for many diseases of fruits,
                          vegetables and field crops (48).

                                   I.  EFFICACY

           To be developed.

                             II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:  CuSO4 3Cu(OH)2 H2O (3)

      PHYSICAL STATE:     Aqua colored powder of extremely fine particle size
                          (3).

      SOLUBILITY:         Water:  insoluble (3)

                          III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  NA

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               ORAL:      LD50 = 1000 mg/kg (estimated) (56)

           B.  SUB-CHRONIC AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           To be developed.

                        IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL  CONSIDERATIONS

           Toxic to fish.  Injury reported on apples, pears and citrus (48).

                      V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P.  Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      SYMPTOMS:

           Copper salts and organic complexes (oxide, hydroxide, arsenite,
      carbonate, chloride, oxalate, phosphate, silicate, sulfate, zinc
      chromate, acetate, naphthenate, oleate, quinolinolate, and resinate).
           These are commonly used as fungicides, either alone or in
      combination with other agents.  There are several dozen proprietary
      products.
           LD50 values vary from 6 to 1000 mg/kg, depending mainly on the
      solubility and degree of ionization of the copper compound.
           Toxicity of copper-arsenite salts is due mainly to the arsenic
      content.
           All of these salts irritate the skin and eyes and damage mucous
      membranes.  When ingested, they are powerfully emetic:  the stomach
      usually empties promptly and automatically in fully conscious
      individuals.  When retained and absorbed, toxic injury affects the
      gastrointestinal lining, capillaries, brain, liver, kidney, and formed
      elements of the blood.  Copper salts are hemolytic.
           Manifestations of poisoning include burning pain in the chest and
      abdomen, intense nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headche, sweating and
      shock.  Later, the liver is enlarged.  Jaundice may reflect hemolysis
      or liver damage or both.  Anuria indicates kidney injury by copper
      and/or free hemoglobin.  Death may occur from convulsions, coma, or
      hepatorenal failure.  Elevated serum copper levels (maximum normal
      level is 125 ug per 100 ml) indicate severity of poisoning (25).

           SKIN CONTACT:  Wash contaminated skin with copious amounts of
                          water (25).

           EYE CONTACT:   Flush eyes with copious amounts of water (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

      Treatment
           Wash contaminated skin and flush eyes with copious amounts of
      water.  If copper salts have been ingested, lavage the stomach with
      0.1% potassium ferrocyanide, then instill a suspension of egg white.
      Intravenous fluids accelerate excretion.  If signs of systemic
      poisoning develop, give dimercaptrol (see Arsenical Pesticides for
      dosage) or penicillamine, 0.5 gm orally four times daily, if patient
      can retain oral medication.  Shock may require blood transfusions and
      pain may require morphine.  Exchange transfusions may be considered in
      severe poisonings.  Renal failure may require protracted hemodialysis
      (25).

                        VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.

                                VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Compatible with most other pesticides (48).

                            VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

      STORAGE AND HANDLING:  Normal storage free from excess moisture.
      Flowable formulations store above freezing (56).

                       IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                     IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                  (800) 424-9300
                      PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC

                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       3.  The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 8th ed.  1971.  VanNostrand
               Reihnold Co., New York, NY.  971 pp.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of
               pesticide poisonings, 3rd ed.  U. S. Environmental Protection
               Agency, Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      48.  Harding, W.C.  1979-80.  Pesticide profiles, part two:  fungicides
               and nematicides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Service Bull.

               283, 22 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

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