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cycloheximide (Acti-dione) Chemical Profile 2/85

                                   cycloheximide

      CHEMICAL NAME:      3-[2-(3,5-Dimethyl-2-oxocyclohexyl)2-hydroxyethyl-]
                          glutarimide (56).

      TRADE NAME(S):      Acti-dione (48)

      FORMULATION(S):     Wettable powder, also in combination with other
                          fungicides (48).

      TYPE:               Antibiotic fungicide

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  TUCO, Division of the Upjohn Co.
                          9823-190-1
                          Kalamazoo, MI 49001

      STATUS:             Restricted use

      PRINCIPAL USES:     Foliar inhibitor of many pathogenic fungi on turf
      and ornamentals (48).
           Inhibits growth of many plant pathogenic fungi.  Effective for
      control of powdery mildew on roses and many other ornamentals, rusts
      and leafspots on lawn grasses, and azalea petal blight (56).


                                   I.  EFFICACY

           To be developed.


                             II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:  C15 H23 NO4 (26)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:   281.4 (26)

      PHYSICAL STATE:     Colorless crystals (pure compound) (26)

      MELTING POINT:      115.5-117 C (pure compound) (26)

      SOLUBILITY:         At 2 C 21 g/l water (pure compound) (26)


                          III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  NA

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               DERMAL:  May irritate the skin (48).

               ORAL:    LD50 = 2 mg/kg (rat); 133 mg/kg (mice); 65 mg/kg
                        (guinea-pig); 60 mg/kg (monkey) (26).  Selectively
                        toxic and extremely repellent to rats (56).

           B.  SUBACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           To be developed.


                        IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL  CONSIDERATIONS

           Hazardous to fish and wildlife.  May be phytotoxic to roses under
      greenhouse conditions (48).


                      V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P.  Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF POISONING

           When ingested, the agent causes excitement, tremors, salivation,
      diarrhea, and melena.  Mechanisms of toxicity are not well defined, but
      probably include irritation of the gut, stimulation of sympathetic and
      parasympathetic nervous systems, renal injury, and damage to the adrenal
      cortex.
           There are no chemical tests to confirm cycloheximide poisoning
      (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

           Remove toxicant from gut by lavage.  Instill activated charcoal,
      then a cathartic dose of sodium sulfate.  Intravenous fluids accelerate
      excretion.  Hydrocortisone appears to be antidotal, particularly in
      combination with the adrenergic agent methoxyphenamine (Orthoxine).
      Atropine relieves the cholinergic symptoms (25).


                        VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                                VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Incompatible with alkaline materials.  Chlordane causes rapid loss
      of activity (48).


                            VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

           To be developed.


                       IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                     IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                  (800) 424-9300
                      PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of
               pesticide poisonings, 3rd ed.  U. S. Environmental Protection
               Agency, Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      26.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 6th ed.  1979.  C. R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  655 pp.

      48.  Harding, W.C.  1979-80.  Pesticide profiles, part two:  fungicides
               and nematicides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Service Bull.
               283, 22 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      2/5/85