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fenamiphos (Nemacur) Chemical Profile 2/85

                                    fenamiphos

      CHEMICAL NAME:      Ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylthio) phenyl (1-methylethyl)
                          phosphoramidate (56)

      TRADE NAME(S):      Nemacur (48)

      FORMULATION(S):     Emulsifiable concentrate and granule (56)

      TYPE:               Organophosphorus nematicide

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  Mobay Chemical Corp.
                          Agri. Chemicals Div.
                          P.O. Box 4913
                          Kansas City, MO 64120

      STATUS:             Restricted use

      PRINCIPAL USES:  Systemic and contact poison against the major
      genera of nematodes attacking field crops, vegetables and turf (48).
           A compound with high nematicidal activity which can be applied
      broadcast, in-the-row, in band, by drench, before or at planting time,
      or to established plants.  Complete soil incorporation is not
      essential.
           Results show it to be a broad spectrum nematicide with good plant
      tolerance to many field, vegetable, and fruit crops.  Presently
      registered for control of the major genera of nematodes attacking cotton,
      peanuts, soybeans, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bananas, turf grasses,
      and non-bearing fruit trees in many major fruit producing states.
      Currently under research in areas where nematodes are a problem (56).


                                   I.  EFFICACY

           Nematicidal activity has been reported against endoparasitic,
      ectoparasitic, cyst forming and root-knotting species belonging to the
      genera Belonolaimus, Criconemoides, Helicotylenchus, Hemicycliophora,
      Heterodera, Meloidogyne, Paratylenchus, Pratylenchus, Radopholus,
      Rotylenchus, Trichodorus, Tylenchorynchus, Tylenchulus, and Tylenchus
      species.  Results also indicate that Nemacur is active against golden
      nematodes (Heterodera rostochiensis) infesting potatoes.
           Preliminary data indicate that Nemacur is systemically active
      against aphids, mites, thrips, fleahoppers, mealybugs, and adult
      cucumber beetles.  Excellent insecticidal and acaricidal activity has
      also been noted with foliar applications of Nemacur on a broad spectrum
      of field and vegetable crops (5c).


                             II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:  C13 H22 NO3 PS (26)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:   303.4 (26)

      PHYSICAL STATE:     Colorless solid (pure compound) (26)

      MELTING POINT:      49 C (pure compound) (26)

      VAPOR PRESSURE:     1 x 10-6 mmHg at 30 C (pure compound) (26)

      SOLUBILITY:         c. 700 mg/l water at room temperature (pure
                          compound) (26)


                          III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  NA

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  NA

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               DERMAL:  LD50 = 178-225 mg/kg (rabbit, technical) (56)

               ORAL:    LD50 = 8.1-9.6 mg/kg (rat, technical) (56)

               INHALATION:  LC50 = 110 ug/l/60 min (male rat, technical);
                            LC50 = 150 ug/l/60 min (female rat, technical) (5c)

           B.  SUBACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           In 2-year feeding trails rats receiving 3 mg/kg diet showed no
      symptom of poisoning (26).


                        IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL  CONSIDERATIONS

           Hazardous to fish.  Soil applications not normally phytotoxic
      (48).


                      V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P.  Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      FREQUENT SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF POISONING BY ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

           Symptoms of acute poisoning develop during exposure or within 12
      hours (usually within four hours) of contact.  HEADACHE, DIZZINESS,
      WEAKNESS, INCOORDINATION, MUSCLE TWITCHING, TREMOR, NAUSEA, ABDOMINAL
      CRAMPS, DIARRHEA, and SWEATING are common early symptoms.  Blurred or
      dark vision, confusion, tightness in the chest, wheezing, productive
      cough, and PULMONARY EDEMA may occur.  Incontinence, unconsciousness
      and convulsions indicate very severe poisoning.  SLOW HEARTBEAT,
      salivation, and tearing are common.  TOXIC PSYCHOSIS, with manic or
      bizarre behavior, has led to misdiagnosis of acute alcoholism.  Slowing
      of the heartbeat may rarely progress to complete sinus arrest.
      RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION may be fatal.  Continuing daily absorption of
      organophosphate at intermediate dosage may cause an INFLUENZA-LIKE
      ILLNESS characterized by weakness, anorexia, and malaise (25).

           SKIN CONTACT:  Bathe and shampoo victim with soap and water if
      there is any chance that skin and hair are contaminated (25).

           INGESTION:  If victim is alert and respiration is not
      depressed, give Syrup of Ipecac, followed by 1-2 glasses of water to
      induce vomiting.  Adults (12 years and over):  30 ml; children under 12
      years:  15 ml (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

      Administer ATROPINE SULFATE intravenously, or intramuscularly, if IV
      injection is not possible.
      In MODERATELY SEVERE poisoning:  Adult dosage:  0.4-2.0 mg repeated
      every 15 minutes until atropinization is achieved:  tachycardia (pulse
      of 140 per minute), flushing, dry mouth, dilated pupils.  Maintain
      atropinization by repeated doses for 2-12 hours or longer depending on
      severity of poisoning.
      Dosage for children under 12 years:  0.05 mg/kg body weight, repeated
      every 15 minutes until atropinization is achieved.  Maintain
      atropinization with repeated dosage of 0.02-0.05 mg/kg.
      SEVERELY POISONED individuals may exhibit remarkable tolerance to
      atropine; two or more times the dosages suggested above may be needed.
      Administer PRALIDOXIME (Protopam (TM)-Ayerst, 2-PAM) in cases of severe
      poisoning in which respiratory depression, muscle weakness and
      twitchings are severe.
      Adult dosage:  1.0 gm intravenously at no more than 0.5 gm per minute.
      Child's dose (under 12 years):  20-50 mg/kg (depending on severity of
      poisoning) intravenously, injecting no more than half the total dose
      per minute.
      Dosage of pralidoxime may be repeated in 1-2 hours, then at 10-12 hour
      intervals if needed.  In very severe poisonings, dosage rates may be
      doubled (25).


                        VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                                VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Incompatible with pesticides alkaline in reaction (48).


                            VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

           To be developed.


                       IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                     IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                  (800) 424-9300
                      PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       5c. Chemagro Division of Baychem Corporation.  1973.  Technical
               information:  Nemacur nematicide.  Kansas City, MO.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of
               pesticide poisonings, 3rd ed.  U. S. Environmental Protection
               Agency, Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      26.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 6th ed.  1979.  C. R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  655 pp.

      48.  Harding, W.C.  1979-80.  Pesticide profiles, part two:  fungicides
               and nematicides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Service Bull.
               283, 22 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      2/4/85