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allethrin (Pynamin) Chemical Profile 4/85

                                  allethrin

      CHEMICAL NAME:      Dl-3-allyl-2-methyl-4-oxocyclopent-2-enyl dl-cis/
                          trans chrysanthemate (56)

      DEC INGRED. CODE:

      TRADE NAME(S):      Pynamin (1)

      FORMULATION(S):  Aerosols, oil sprays, dusts, and oils with or without
      a synergist such as piperonyl butoxide (Butacide) for use in the
      household.  Also in emusifiable concentrates, wettable powders, oil base
      and water base sprays (56).

      TYPE:               Synthetic pyrethrins-like

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  McLaughlin Gormley King Co.
                          8810 Tenth Ave., N.
                          Minneapolis, MN   55427

      STATUS:             General use

      PRINCIPAL USES:  Not as effective against as wide a variety of insects as
      pyrethrins.  Used mainly in control of flies and mosquitoes in homes.
      Used also in combinations for flying and crawling insects, farm sprays
      for livestock, dairy sprays, and against fleas and ticks on dogs and
      cats (56).


                              I.  EFFICACY

      Important Pests Controlled:  Mosquitoes, flies, aphids, Mexican bean
      beetles, imported cabbage worms, mealy bugs, beetles, thrips, fleabeetle,
      sod webworm, loopers, leafhoppers, lice, Colorado potato beetle and many
      others (8a).
           Allethrin is as toxic to insects as natural pyrethrins, but it has
      longer residual effects (8a).


                          II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:  C19 H26 O3 (62)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:   302.4 (62)

      PHYSICAL STATE:     Pale yellow to yellow-brown liquid (technical grade)
                          (62)

      BOILING POINT:      140 C/0.1 mmHg (technical grade) (62)

      VAPOR PRESSURE:     16 mPa at 30 C (technical grade) (62)

      SOLUBILITY:         Insoluble in water (56)


                       III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  None established

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               DERMAL:  LD50 = >2500 mg/kg (rat) (62)

               ORAL:    LD50 (rat) = 1100 mg/kg (male), 685 mg/kg (female)
                          (62).

           B.  SUB-CHRONIC AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           To be developed.


                     IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

           Little or no hazard to birds, fish, and beneficial insects.
      Relatively nonhazardous to honey bees.  Biological magnification
      unlikely.  Nonphytotoxic (1).
           LC50 (96-hr) is: for steelhead trout 17.5 mg/l; for channel catfish
      30.1 mg/l (62).
           Very toxic to cold blooded animals (8a).

      Approximate Residual Period:  Very short-lived on exposed surfaces and
      in soil and water (1).


                    V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P. Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      FREQUENT SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF UNDUE EXPOSURE TO PYRETHRUM, PYRETHRINS,
      PYRETHROIDS, AND PIPERONYL BUTOXIDE.

           A STUFFY, RUNNY NOSE and scratchy throat from inhalation of partly
      purified pyrethrum extract is the most common adverse effect of these
      agents.  Asthmatic WHEEZING may be precipitated by exposure of
      predisposed individuals.  Sudden bronchospasm, swelling of oral and
      laryngeal mucous membranes, and shock (anaphylaxis) have been reported
      after pyrethrum inhalation.  Delayed appearance of dyspnea, cough and
      fever, with patchy lung infiltrates on x-ray, suggest hypersensitivity
      pneumonitis.  Nervous irritability, tremors, and ataxia have occurred
      rarely in persons who have had massive inhalation exposure to
      pyrethrins.  Halocarbon propellents in bug-bomb products present a risk
      of CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA and possibly fibrillation if inhaled to excess.
      Hydrocarbons used as solvents in spray products are likely to result in
      COUGH, FEVER, and CHEST PAIN (hydrocarbon pneumonitis) if these liquids
      are inadvertently aspirated (25).

           SKIN CONTACT:  Wash with soap and water (25).

           INGESTION:  If large amounts of pyrethrin or pyrethroid formulation
      have been ingested:  If victim is alert and respirtion is not depressed,
      give Syrup of Ipecac, followed by 1-2 glasses of water, to induce
      vomiting (adults and children 12 years and older): 30 ml; children: 15 ml
      (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

           If victim is not fully alert, empty stomach immediately by
      intubation, aspiration, and lavage, using isotonic saline or 5% sodium
      bicarbonate.  Because many pesticides are dissolved in petroleum
      distillates, emesis and intubation of the stomach involve a risk that
      solvent will be aspirated, leading to chemical pneumonitis.  Do not
      administer or instill milk, cream, or other substances containing
      vegetable or animal fats, which enhance absorption of lipophilic
      substances, such as pyrethrins and pyrethroids.

           Diazepam (Valium) 5-10 mg in adults, 0.1 mg/kg in children, given
      orally or slowly IV, should control nervousness and tremors in rare
      cases having these symptoms after extraordinary exposure to pyrethrins
      and pyrethroids (25).


                    VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                             VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Not compatible with Bordeaux, calcium arsenate, lime, lime sulfur,
      and soaps.  Ineffective in alkaline solutions.  Not compatible with lead,
      brass, copper, zinc or iron (8a).


                       VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

      PROTECTIVE CLOTHING:  Goggles, gloves, and respirator should be used
      when handling technical grade or 90%.  None required for handling usual
      products for home and industry (56).


                     IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                    IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                 (800) 424-9300
                     PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       1.  Harding, W.C.  1979.  Pesticide profiles, part one: insecticides
               and miticides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Serv. Bull. 267.
               30 pp.

       8a. Thomson, W. T.  1976.  Agricultural chemicals - book 1:
               insecticides, acaricides, and ovicides.  Revised ed.  Thomson
               Publ., Indianapolis, IN.  232 pp.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of pesticide
               poisonings, 3rd ed.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
               Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      62.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 7th ed.  1983.  C.R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  695 pp.

      4/25/85