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ethylan (Perthane) Chemical Profile 4/85

                                     ethylan

      CHEMICAL NAME:      1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(4-ethylphenyl) ethane (56)

      DEC INGRED. CODE:

      TRADE NAME(S):      Perthane (56)

      FORMULATION(S):     Available as an 88% active technical.  Also available
                          in aerosol cans for mothproofing (1).

      TYPE:               Organochlorine insecticide

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  Rohm and Haas Co.
                          Independence Mall West
                          Philadelphia, PA 19105

      STATUS:             Product discontinued by Rohm and Haas Co (56).

      PRINCIPAL USES:  Limited registration for insects on fruit and
      vegetables.  Used for home mothproofing and for moths and carpet beetles
      in dry cleaning and textile industries (1).


                                   I.  EFFICACY

           To be developed.


                             II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:   C18 H20 Cl2 (26)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:    307.3 (26)

      PHYSICAL STATE:      Crystalline solid (pure compound); wax (technical
                           product) (26).

      MELTING POINT:       60-61 C (pure compound); greater than or equal to
                           40 C (technical product) (26).

      SOLUBILITY:          Practically insoluble in water (26)


                           III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  None established

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               ORAL:  LD50 = 8170 mg/kg (rat); 6600 mg/kg (mouse) (26).

           B.  SUBACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           In 2-yr feeding trials rats receiving 500 mg/kg diet suffered no
      mortality or ill-effect on their blood (26).


                        IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

           Little or no hazard to birds, fish and beneficial insects.
      Moderately hazardous to honey bees.  Biological magnification unlikely.
      Russeting reported on some pears (1).

      Approximate Residual Period:  1-2 weeks on plants and inert surfaces.
      May protect clothes from moths up to 1 year (1).


                      V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P.  Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      FREQUENT SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF POISONING BY ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES

           APPREHENSION, EXCITABILITY, DIZZINESS, HEADACHE, DISORIENTATION,
      WEAKNESS, PARESTHESIAE, muscle twitching, tremor, tonic and clonic
      CONVULSIONS (often epileptiform), and unconsciousness are the major
      manifestations.  Soon after ingestion, nausea and vomiting commonly
      occur.  When chemicals are absorbed dermally, apprehension, twitching,
      tremors, confusion, and convulsions may be the first symptoms.
      Respiratory depression is caused by the pesticide and by the petroleum
      solvents in which these pesticides are usually dissolved.  Pallor occurs
      in moderate to severe poisoning.  Cyanosis may result as convulsive
      activity interferes with respiration (25).

           SKIN CONTACT:  Bathe and shampoo the victim vigorously with soap
      and water if skin and hair have been contaminated (25).

           INGESTION:  If victim is alert and gag reflex is not depressed, give
      Syrup of Ipecac to induce vomiting (adults and children 12 years and
      older: 30 ml; children under 12: 15 ml), followed by 1-2 glasses of water
      (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

      CONTROL CONVULSIONS.  DIAZEPAM (VALIUM (TM)) is a valuable
      anticonvulsant.
      Adult dosage:  5-10 mg (1-2 ml) slowly, intravenously (no faster than
      one ml per minute) or give total dose intramuscularly (deep).  Repeat
      in 2-4 hours if needed.
      Dosage for children under 6 years or 23 kg in weight:  0.1 mg/kg (0.02
      ml/kg) intravenously, no faster than half the total dose per minute, or
      give total dose intramuscularly (deep).  Repeat in 2-4 hours if needed.
      Persons suffering SEVERE PROTRACTED CONVULSIONS may require additional
      anticonvulsant medication.  Agents that have been used successfully in
      the past are pentobarbital (Numbutal (TM)), phenytoin (Dilantin (TM)),
      thiopental (Pentothal (TM)), and succinylcholine (Anectine (TM)).
      If the victim is NOT FULLY ALERT, empty the stomach immediately by
      INTUBATION, ASPIRATION, and LAVAGE, using isotonic saline or 5% sodium
      bicarbonate.  Because many pesticides are dissolved in petroleum
      distillates, emesis and intubation of the stomach involve a serious
      risk that solvent will be aspirated, leading to chemical pneumonitis.
      DO NOT give epinephrine or other adrenergic amines, because of the
      enhanced myocardial irritability induced by chlorinated hydrocarbons
      (25).


                         VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                               VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Usually not mixed with other materials (1).


                             VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

           To be developed.


                      IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                     IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                  (800) 424-9300
                      PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       1.  Harding, W.C.  1979.  Pesticide profiles, part one: insecticides
               and miticides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Serv. Bull. 267.
               30 pp.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of
               pesticide poisonings, 3rd ed.  U. S. Environmental Protection
               Agency, Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      26.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 6th ed.  1979.  C. R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  655 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      4/23/85