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piperonyl butoxide Chemical Profile 3/85

                                 piperonyl butoxide

      CHEMICAL NAME:      3,4-methylenedioxy-6-propylbenzyl (heptyl) diethylene
                          glycol ether (56)

      DEC INGRED. CODE:

      TRADE NAME(S):      Butacide (56)

      FORMULATION(S):  Used as a synergist in conjunction with pyrethrin,
      allethrin, and other synthetic pyrethroids, etc., in ratios ranging
      from 3:1 to 20:1 by weight, as pressurized sprays, solutions, emulsions,
      foggers, dusts, wettable powders, paper coatings, and E.C. for tank
      mix (Fairfield American, Penick); E.C. 8 pounds/gallon (McLaughlin
      Gormley King) (56).

      TYPE:               Organic synergist

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  Fairfield American Corp.   Prentiss Drug & Chem. Co
                          3932 Salt Road             3673 Seventh Ave.
                          Medina, NY 14103           New York, NY 10001

                          McLaughlin Gormley King Co.
                          8810 Tenth Ave. North
                          Minneapolis, MN 55427

      STATUS:  General use.  RPAR: criteria possibly met or exceeded:
      co-carcinogenicity, carcinogenicity.  Decision document complete.  FR
      notice 47 FR 20376 published 5/12/82.  NTIS # PB83-0137901.  Returned
      to the Registration Process on May 12, 1982.  Section 3(c)(2)(B) Notice
      requesting additional data issued on Sept. 30, 1983 (22).

      PRINCIPAL USES:  Highly synergistic action on pyrethrins, allethrin,
      tetramethrin, rotenone, and others when combined with these insecticides
      (56).

                                   I.  EFFICACY

           To be developed.


                             II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA:  C19 H30 O5 (62)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:   338.4 (62)

      PHYSICAL STATE:     Pale yellow oil (technical product) (62)

      BOILING POINT:      180 C/l mmHg (technical product) (62)

      SOLUBILITY:         Not soluble in water (56)


                          III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  None established

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               DERMAL:  LD50 = >1880 mg/kg (1)

               ORAL:    LD50 = c. 7500 mg/kg (rat, rabbit) (62)
                        LD50 = >7500 mg/kg (rat) (56)

           B.  SUBACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           In 2-yr feeding trials rats receiving 100 mg/kg diet suffered no
      ill-effect (62).
           It is noncarcinogenic and the safe human tolerance for chronic
      ingestion is estimated at 42 mg/kg diet (62).


                        IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL  CONSIDERATIONS

           Little or no hazard to birds, fish and beneficial insects (1).

      Approximate Residual Period:  Short-lived compound; when combined with
      pyrethrins and some others gives good knockdown and kill (1).


                      V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P.  Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      FREQUENT SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF UNDUE EXPOSURE TO PYRETHRUM, PYRETHRINS,
      PYRETHROIDS, AND PIPERONYL BUTOXIDE

           A STUFFY, RUNNY NOSE and scratchy throat from inhalation of partly
      purified pyrethrum extract is the most common adverse effect of these
      agents.  Asthmatic WHEEZING may be precipitated by exposure of
      predisposed individuals.  Sudden bronchospasm, swelling of oral and
      laryngeal mucous membranes, and shock (anaphylaxis) have been reported
      after pyrethrum inhalation.  Delayed appearance of dyspnea, cough and
      fever, with patchy lung infiltrates on x-ray, suggest hypersensitivity
      pneumonitis.  Nervous irritability, tremors, and ataxia have occurred
      rarely in persons who have had massive inhalation exposure to
      pyrethrins.  Halocarbon propellents in bug-bomb products present a risk
      of CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA and possibly fibrillation if inhaled to excess.
      Hydrocarbons used as solvents in spray products are likely to result in
      COUGH, FEVER, and CHEST PAIN (hydrocarbon pneumonitis) if these liquids
      are inadvertently aspirated (25).

           INGESTION:  If large amounts of pyrethroid formulation (>5
      mg/kg) have been ingested:

           If victim is alert and respiration is not depressed, give Syrup of
      Ipecac followed by 1-2 glasses of water to induce vomiting (adults and
      children 12 years and older: 30 ml; children under 12 years: 15 ml) (25).

           EYE CONTACT:  Wash contaminating pesticide from the eye with
      copious amounts of water.  Wash contaminated skin with soap and water
      (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

      If victim is not fully alert, empty stomach immediately by intubation,
      aspiration, and lavage, using isotonic saline or 5% sodium bicarbonate.
      Because many pesticides are dissolved in petroleum distillates, emesis
      and intubation of the stomach involve a risk that solvent will be
      aspirated, leading to chemical pneumonitis.  Do not administer or
      instill milk, cream, or other substances containing vegetable or animal
      fats, which enhance absorption of lipophilic substances, such as
      pyrethrins and pyrethroids.

      Diazepam (Valium) 5-10 mg in adults, 0.1 mg/kg in children, given
      orally or slowly IV, should control nervousness and tremors in rare
      cases having these symptoms after extraordinary exposure to pyrethrins
      and pyrethroids (25).


                        VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                                VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           To be developed.


                            VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

      STORAGE AND HANDLING:  Ordinary good manufacturing practices and
      sanitation.  Ventilate well.  Store in closed drum in cool, dry place
      (56).

      PROTECTIVE CLOTHING:  None (56).


                       IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                     IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                  (800) 424-9300
                      PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       1.  Harding, W.C.  1979.  Pesticide profiles, part one: insecticides
               and miticides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Serv. Bull. 267.
               30 pp.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of pesticide
               poisonings, 3rd ed.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
               Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      62.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 7th ed.  1983.  C.R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  695 pp.

      3/29/85