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pirimicarb (Pirimor) Chemical Profile 4/85

                                  pirimicarb

      CHEMICAL NAME:      2-Dimethylamino-5,6-dimethylpyrimidin-4-yl dimethyl-
                          carbamate (56)

      DEC INGRED. CODE:

      TRADE NAME(S):      Pirimor, Abol, Aficida, Aphox, Fernos, Rapid (56)

      FORMULATION(S):     Dispersible grains, dispersible powders, emulsifiable
                          concentrates, aerosol, ULV spray, smoke generator
                          (56).

      TYPE:               Carbamate insecticide (aphicide)

      BASIC PRODUCER(S):  ICI Plant Protection Division
                          Fernhurst, Haslemere,
                          Surrey GU27 3JE England

      STATUS:             General use

      PRINCIPAL USES:  A fast-acting selective aphicide useful against both
      OP-resistant and non-OP-resistant strains.  It acts by contact,
      translaminar, vapor, and systemic action.  Used on a wide range of
      crops including cereals, sugar beet, potatoes, fruit, vegetables.  It
      is relatively nontoxic to beneficial predators, parasites, and bees (56).


                                I.  EFFICACY

      Important Pests Controlled:  Aphids, flies and many others (8a).
           Fast acting.  Relatively short residual.  Very selective.  Has a
      quick knockdown effect.  Ideal for use in greenhouses (8a).


                           II.  PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

      MOLECULAR FORMULA: C11 H18 N4 O2 (62)

      MOLECULAR WEIGHT:  238.3 (62)

      PHYSICAL STATE:    Colorless solid (pure compound) (62)

      ODOR:              None (20a)

      MELTING POINT:     90.5 C (pure compound) (62)

      VAPOR PRESSURE:    4.0 mPa at 30 C (pure compound) (62)

      SOLUBILITY:        2.7 g/l water at 25 C (pure compound) (62)


                        III.  HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION

      OSHA STANDARD:  None established

      NIOSH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      ACGIH RECOMMENDED LIMIT:  None established

      TOXICOLOGY

           A.  ACUTE TOXICITY

               DERMAL:  LD50 = >500 mg/kg (rat) (56); nonirritant (20a).

               ORAL:    LD50 = 147 mg/kg (rat) (56)
                        LD50 = 107 mg/kg (mouse); 25-50 mg/kg (poultry);
                          100-200 mg/kg (dog) (62).

               EYES:    Pirimor caused no irritation when introduced as a 5%
                        solution of technical material into the eyes of
                        rabbits (20a).

           B.  SUBACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY:

           Rat:  No ill effects were detected when rats were fed 750 ppm for 90
      days.
           Dog:  In feeding tests for a period of 90 days, a no-effect level of
      1.8 mg/kg was demonstrated.
           Daily application of 500 mg/kg to rabbits (dermally) for 24 hours
      over a 14 day period produced no toxic signs during the experiment or
      during the next 14 days (20a).

           Rats exposed for 6 hr/d (5 d/week) for 21 d, to air which had been
      passed over technical pirimicarb at room temperature developed no toxic
      sign, nor was there inhibition of cholinesterase.  Daily applications of
      500 mg/kg (for 24-hr) to rabbit skin over a 14-day period produced no
      toxic symptom.  In 2-yr feeding trials NEL was: for dogs 1.8 mg/kg daily;
      for rats 250 mg/kg diet (12.5 mg/kg daily) (62).


                     IV.  ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

           Some hazard to fish, birds, and beneficial insects.  Some hazard to
      honey bees.  Biological magnification unlikely.  Nonphytotoxic (1).
           Does not harm lady bugs or lacewings.  Low bee toxicity (8a).
           LC50 (96-hr) is: for bluegill 55 mg/l; for rainbow trout 29 mg/l.
      Acute oral LD50 for mallard duck 17.2 mg/kg; for bobwhite quail 8.2 mg/kg
      (62).

      Approximate Residual Period:  Relatively short in plants; broken down
      rapidly by ultraviolet light (1).


                    V.  EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

           The chemical information provided below has been condensed
      from original source documents, primarily from "Recognition and
      Management of Pesticide Poisonings", 3rd ed. by Donald P. Morgan,
      which have been footnoted.  This information has been provided in
      this form for your convenience and general guidance only.  In
      specific cases, further consultation and reference may be required
      and is recommended.  This information is not intended as a sub-
      stitute for a more exhaustive review of the literature nor for the
      judgement of a physician or other trained professional.

           If poisoning is suspected, do not wait for symptoms to develop.
      Contact a physician, the nearest hospital, or the nearest Poison
      Control Center.

      FREQUENT SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF POISONING BY CARBAMATE PESTICIDES

      DIARRHEA, NAUSEA, VOMITING, ABDOMINAL PAIN, PROFUSE SWEATING,
      SALIVATION, and BLURRED VISION are frequently reported.  Other common
      symptoms have been dyspnea, tremor, muscle twitching, ataxia, and
      headache.  Temporary paralysis of the extremities has also occurred.
      Most reported illnesses have not exceeded a few hours, and the
      prognosis is generally better than in organophosphate intoxications.
      However, in severe poisonings, one should anticipate the possibility of
      RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION, pulmonary edema, and convulsions.  Continuing
      absorption of intermediate quantities may cause protracted MALAISE,
      weakness, and anorexia, resembling influenza (25).

           SKIN CONTACT:  Wash with soap and water (25).

           INGESTION:  If victim is alert and respiration is not depressed,
      give Syrup of Ipecac, followed by 1-2 glasses of water to induce
      vomiting; adults (including children over 12), 30 ml; children (under
      12 years), 15 ml (25).

      NOTES TO PHYSICIAN:

      For severe poisoning atropine is an antidote and should be given
      immediately intramuscularly at a level of 1 to 4 mg and then 2 mg every
      30 minutes.  The patient must be kept fully atropinized.  Oxime
      reactivators (pralidoxime, P-25, P-2-AM) are not effective.  Oxygen
      and artificial respiration may be required (20a).


                     VI.  FIRE AND EXPLOSION INFORMATION

           To be developed.


                             VII.  COMPATIBILITY

           Compatible with most materials (1).


                          VIII.  PROTECTIVE MEASURES

      STORAGE AND HANDLING:  No special handling precautions are necessary
      during conventional spraying.  Remove contaminated clothing and launder
      before re-use.  Wash thoroughly after handling.  Avoid breathing dust
      or spray mist.  Avoid contact with eyes (20a).

      PROTECTIVE CLOTHING:  Gloves, overalls (21a).


                      IX.  PROCEDURES FOR SPILLS AND LEAKS

                    IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL, DAY OR NIGHT
                                 (800) 424-9300
                     PESTICIDE TEAM SAFETY NETWORK/CHEMTREC


                               X.  LITERATURE CITED

       1.  Harding, W.C.  1979.  Pesticide profiles, part one: insecticides
               and miticides.  Univ. Maryland, Coop. Ext. Serv. Bull. 267.
               30 pp.

       8a. Thomson, W. T.  1976.  Agricultural chemicals - book 1:
               insecticides, acaricides, and ovicides.  Revised ed.  Thomson
               Publ., Indianapolis, IN.  232 pp.

      20a. ICI United States, Inc.  1976.  Technical information:  Pirimor
               insecticide.  Goldsboro, NC.

      21a. Agricultural Canada, Products and Marketing Branch, Plant Products
               Division.  1972.  Registration of a new pesticide:
               pirimicarb.  Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

      25.  Morgan, D.P.  1982.  Recognition and management of pesticide
               poisonings, 3rd ed.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
               Washington, DC.  120 pp.

      56.  Farm Chemicals Handbook, 70th ed.  1984.  R. T. Meister, G. L.
               Berg, C. Sine, S. Meister, and J. Poplyk, eds.  Meister
               Publishing Co., Willoughby, OH.

      62.  The Pesticide Manual:  A World Compendium, 7th ed.  1983.  C.R.
               Worthing, ed.  The British Crop Protection Council, Croydon,
               England.  695 pp.

      4/26/85